Management / Just Eat on how to deliver a multichannel marketing strategy

Just Eat on how to deliver a multichannel marketing strategy

From humble beginnings in a Danish basement in 2001 to a listing on the London Stock Exchange, online food marketplace Just Eat has certainly delivered for its shareholders.

It is now a global business which relies on an effective multichannel marketing strategy to succeed in 13 countries, each with a fragmented media environment.

“We must be data-driven, precise in our targeting and have a consistent message across all channels,” says global chief marketing officer Barnaby Dawe. “A Facebook ad would look different to a banner ad, but the overall messaging and targeting strategy would be the same.”

Just Eat has 16 million customers worldwide, using its platform to order everything from pizzas to sushi, burgers and burritos from about 64,000 restaurant partners.

“We need people who understand the importance of brand in a fragmented media world and appreciate the connection between a brand strategy, the advertising messages and the media channels that deliver those messages.” – Barnaby Dawe, Just Eat

The UK is its most mature market with 45 per cent of consumers ordering food online. In Italy the figure is only 7 per cent. In most countries Just Eat’s main competitor remains the telephone.

Marketing and technology are the company’s biggest investment areas and traditional media channels are crucial to its growth. “We use TV in most markets and, interestingly for an e-commerce business, we see a real rise in demand online when we do invest in TV,” says Dawe. “That said, we always use performance channels to convert the awareness generated by TV into customer acquisition.”

The company’s restaurant partners benefit from this multichannel strategy because awareness of the Just Eat brand helps to drive customers to their outlets. There is also joint local marketing between the restaurants and Just Eat using out-of-home, radio, PR, SEO, social and PPC activity.

“We use our data to match customers with their preferred cuisine types and send them to specific local restaurants.”

One difficulty for any brand developing a multichannel marketing strategy is finding the marketers with the required skills it needs.

“A few years ago it was all about digital, and chief marketing officers were on the hunt for performance marketing specialists. Today digital is the norm,” says Dawe.

“We need people who understand the importance of brand in a fragmented media world and appreciate the connection between a brand strategy, the advertising messages and the media channels that deliver those messages.”