Learning & Development / How millennials are inspiring firms to rethink the meaning of work

How millennials are inspiring firms to rethink the meaning of work

The different attitudes of the millennial generation in the workplace were a major focus at the FUTR M2020 Summit.

Millennials have different expectations about a job than previous generations. Work for them is not just about making money or career progression, but rather about doing something they care about. And such new ways of looking at work have been disrupting businesses and changing the way companies approach it.

Speaking to Business Reporter at the summit, Benjamin Habbel, who sits on the EXCom-Y at Movenpick Hotels & Resorts and is founder of Atrium Capital, says: “The number one thing that has changed for this new generation in the workspace is that they care more than anything about fulfilment and meaningful work, which can mean a lot of different things.”

“It is not just the euro, the pound, the dollar… it is also about where we are going with this. What is its impact on my community? What is my impact on my family? Before, there was a much bigger focus on the pure dollar amount and getting up in the ranks, no matter what the content of the work really was.”

"“New thinking changes the way that companies hire, create physical workspaces, development programmes, training programmes and so forth. That to me is the biggest change.”"

Habbel, who was previously Chief of Staff at Google, is a big believer in personal development and balancing the different aspects of work and life.

“What has changed is the insight that happiness is directly correlated to the way you spend your day – more so than the dollar amount that ends up in your bank account at the end of the month,” he says. “What is the impact of my everyday job on the environment? How am I improving the state of the world with my everyday job? Audacious as it may sound, it actually matters”.

“What has changed is the insight that happiness is directly correlated to the way you spend your day – more so than the dollar amount that ends up in your bank account at the end of the month,” he says. “What is the impact of my everyday job on the environment? How am I improving the state of the world with my everyday job? Audacious as it may sound, it actually matters”.

This way of thinking, Habbel says, is making workforces more sustainable because “if the individual contributor is trying to make a change, the collective will definitely make it.”


Originally published in Business Reporter Online: June 2018

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