Edge computing, IoT, data, data monetisation, cloud computing

Management / Podcast: How to get the edge in cloud computing and cat videos

Podcast: How to get the edge in cloud computing and cat videos

Business Reporter travels to VMWorld 2018 in Las Vegas to find out how edge computing is helping to streamline data-crunching – and why it will be crucial for the cat video industry…

The cloud is a busy and crowded place, and with so much data moving back and forth things can get a little congested up there. But an emerging technology called edge computing is changing all that, by allowing data to be processed in real-time away from the cloud.

According to CB Insights, as more devices become connected to the internet the average person will generate 1.5GB of data per day by 2020, making it increasingly difficult for data to be processed efficiently within the cloud itself.

This is where edge computing can help. Edge works by being able to compute data as close as possible to – or at the edge of – the source of its creation. This can be done through sensors within the device itself, or physically close to it. Data can then be analysed in real time instead of having to go all the way up to the cloud and back again.

“It is impossible for all of this data to just mindlessly be sent to the cloud, or any number of clouds,” Jason Shepherd, CTO for IoT and Edge Computing at Dell Technologies, tells Business Reporter at VMWorld 2018 in Las Vegas.

Shepherd cites the example of how he and his wife both bought extra storage capacity on their phones so they could send videos of their two cats to each other. “If I put a cat video out on the internet and a lot of people watch it, I need to start caching that video to go on a lot of servers,” he explains.

“If it goes viral, we need to move that video as close to the mobile phone subscribers as we can.” In other words, it’s far better for the data to be processed as near as possible to where the subscriber is using their phone, or at the mobile cell tower.

Elsewhere, the car industry has been using a similar approach in autonomous vehicles to ensure their decisions are deployed in real time. “I can’t rely on a network that may fail,” Shepherd explains. “[If] I am deploying an airbag, I need that computation to happen right there.”

Where Shepherd thinks edge computing make a big difference is the way in which data is monetised. “Today, the way you monetise data is that you have to convince, one by one, people that you know to build a business relationship,” he says. A company will vet you to see how you collect the data, he explains, before they hopefully trust it is real and decide to pay a price for it.

“What you do differently in the edge is that you have to have these open frameworks to build that trust to be able to monetise that data in scale,” he said. “I don’t have to know you because I know if you are part of these open frameworks, I know that your data is real.

“I will not only pay for it [when] I don’t even know you, I will pay a premium for it because it is real.”

“What you do differently in the edge is that you have to have these open frameworks to build that trust to be able to monetise that data in scale,” he said. “I don’t have to know you because I know if you are part of these open frameworks, I know that your data is real.

“I will not only pay for it [when] I don’t even know you, I will pay a premium for it because it is real.”


This podcast is also available on iTunes and Stitcher

Podcast music AcidJazz by Kevin MacLeod, Free Music Archive, (CC BY 3.0)